16 June 2014

Red Fort / Lal Qila, Delhi

After our first day's tour of Connaught place, India Gate, Firoz Shah Kotla Fort, we had booked a day tour with Delhi Tourism HOHO bus service for the second day. With Red Fort not listed under our route with HOHO, we thought of visiting Red Fort before catching our HOHO bus. Red Fort was the first place we witnessed when we entered Delhi, staying just opposite to it, at Lal Mandir, we got its glimpse every time we left out for the city tour.
The red fort in old Delhi was the fortified palace of Shahjahanabad, capital of Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in 1648. Constructed along the river Yamuna, the fort was commissioned when Shah Jahan decided to shift his capital from Agra to Delhi. The fort gets its name from its massive red sand stone walls, reflecting magnificent Mughal rule, its architecture is a fusion of Timurid, Persian and Hindu traditions.
And its known for the Independence Day celebration, when the Prime Minister of the country hoists the Indian flag and addresses the nation from the Lahore Gate of the fort.
Red Fort, Delhi
Naubat Khana, clicked from Diwan-i-Aam
After buying the tickets(a collective ticket for the main entrance and museums inside the fort), you enter the fort through Lahore Gate, the gate which faces Lahore, the city now in Pakistan. As you enter the Lahore Gate, is the roofed street called Chatta Bazaar, lined up with shops selling souvenirs. The two storeyed buildings are said to have catered luxury trade of silk, velvet, brocades, gold and silverware, jewelry and gems during Shah Jahan's rule.
Red Fort, Delhi
Diwan-i-Aam
The exit of the Chatta Bazaar leads you to the open space. Next is the Naubat Khana, a gate which takes you to the Diwan-i-Aam. Naubat Khana also houses the Indian War Memorial Museum. The museum has galleries pertaining to military history of India during first and second world war.
Diwan-i-Aam, a hall for the public audience during the rule, has the marble throne with intricate work. The walls and pillars too reflect great architectural beauty.
Red Fort, Delhi
The marble throne at Diwan-i-Aam
Red Fort, Delhi
Carvings on outer wall of Diwan-i-Aam
 There are a row of pavilions towards the back of Diwan-i-Aam. The pavilions are said to be connected by a canal known as Nahi-i-Behisht(Stream of Paradise).
Red Fort, Delhi
Diwan-i-Khas
The row of pavilions include, Mumtaz Mahal(which houses Red Fort Archaeological Museum), Rang Mahal(Palace of colours) for emperor's wives and mistresses, Khas Mahal(emperor's apartment), Diwan-i-Khas(hall of private audience), Moti Masjid(Pearl Mosque), Hammam(the imperial baths). All the pavilions have great marble work inlaid with precious stones. 
The Archaeological Museum exhibits the articles belonging to Akbar and his successors and Bahadur Shah Zafar. Exhibits include miniature paintings, manuscripts, porcelain and jade objects, textile, furniture and other belongings of royal rulers.
Red Fort, Delhi
Diwan-i-Khas
Red Fort, Delhi
Diwan-i-Khas
Further ahead is the Hayat Bakhsh Bagh, meaning "Life Bestowing Garden" had beautiful gardens, which were destoryed during British rule. The garden presently has a reservoir with channels, with red stone Zafar Mahal at the center and two white pavilions Savon and Bhadon at the end.
Red Fort, Delhi
Window at Khas Mahal
Red Fort, Delhi
 Rang Mahal
Beyond the Hayat Bakhsh Bagh, the road leads to Salimgarh Fort through arched bridge.
Travel Info:
Red Fort is at Netaji Subhash Marg. Nearest Metro station is Chandi Chowk.
Entry fee:
Indian tourists: Rs. 10
Foreign tourists: Rs. 250
Fort is closed on Mondays and open from sunrise to sunset rest of the days.
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Related Posts: Check out the complete series on Golden Triangle Tour.  

24 comments:

  1. I have visited it many times but it always attracts me , not only Lal qila but all the monuments which are not very popular indeed . I always tried to find the monuments which are not in the list of travelers . Nice post with great pictures . will request you to pl have a visit some unknown but beautiful places of Delhi , for this purpose you may visit my blog .

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    1. Thank you Yogi Saraswat, u have a wonderful blog..

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  2. You've given us a virtual tour of the Fort.

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  3. Loved the corridors and the side shot of the carvings. The islamic architecture is a delight to watch, esp in Delhi :).. I missed out on red fort the last time I was there. I hear that the Delhi by cycle and the Food tours in Delhi are a lot of fun., Maybe a good try on the next visit :)

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    1. True Vinay, Delhi has lot to offer when it comes to architectural beauty. You should try the street food at Chandni Chowk by cycle..

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  4. I haven't seen so much details of this, just had a glimpse from far.
    Great series Meghana.

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  5. Your blog is really provide very informative information about Delhi. Book bus ticket online at runBus and start your reliable journey with your family and friends.

    Thanks again another new and update post.

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  6. Dynamic post and very beautiful photos of your world for OWT ~ thanks, ^_^

    artmusedog and carol ( A Creative Harbor)

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  7. beautiful fort and the architecture is splendid. thanks for the tour.

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  8. Given good account of your presence at the fort..!

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  9. Thank you everyone for your comments and appreciation.. :)

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  10. There seems so much to see there that it would take all day to appreciate its treasures.

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  11. This is a great post...so interesting and your photos are wonderful.

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  12. I'm looking forward to visit India with my girls one day... But for now I'm dreaming with your pictures and descriptions!

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  13. Thanks for updating more information. Similarly you can also get more information about the top 15 places to see in delhi by visiting this site.

    places to see in Delhi

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